www.asia-studies.com

  home search about subscribe contact  

 

 

 

 

 

Home

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to Asia-Studies Full-Text Online

The Most Comprehensive and Authoritative Source of
Asia-Pacific Information

 
 

Asia-Studies Full-Text Online is the premier database for the study of modern Asia Pacific. As the exclusive licensee for many of the region's most prestigious research institutions, Asia-Studies.com brings together thousands of full-text reports covering 55 countries* on a multitude of business, government, economic, and social issues.

 
  more . . .  
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

Library Journal eReview rates Asia-Studies Full-Text 10/10 on content and 9/10 overall.

 
 

* Library Journal is a trademark of Media Source

   
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

We index full-text journals with open access platforms in our NEW Asia-Studies Full-Text Plus section. Here is the list of journals available.

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

April, 2016 Current Topics

 

Source

 

 

 

 

Defence White Paper 2016: The Strategist Decides, April 2016. In this volume we’ve assembled a selection of articles written in the weeks after the release of DWP 2016. The papers cover the strategic outlook, force structure and military strategy, budget and Industry, and regional reactions to the White Paper. The authors are Robert Ayson, Ross Babbage, Kim Beazley, Andrew Davies, Malcolm Davis, Tobias Feakin, Tim Huxley, Peter Jennings, Mike Kalms, Rod Lyon, James Mugg, Benjamin Schreer, Ristian Atriandi Supriyanto, Mark Thomson, Feng Zhang.

 

ASPI

Peak Japan and Its Implications for Regional Security, March 2016. This paper examines Japanese security policy under Abe, identifies the constants and constraints that frame that policy, and attempts to project where Japan will go in the near-term future. Its conclusion may unnerve many: structural constraints in the Japanese economy, self-imposed limits deriving from Japanese national identity and an increasingly beleaguered polity will narrow Japanese options. The chief task of friends and allies of Japan, including Australia, will be to engage Tokyo and ensure that there’s a place for Japan in regional security policy.

 

ASPI

Hong Kong: High Frequency Macroeconomic Forecasts Current Quarter Model: 2016Q2, April 2016. According to its High Frequency Macroeconomic Forecast, real GDP is estimated to grow by 1.7% in 16Q1, when compared with the same period in 2015. In 16Q2, real GDP growth is expected to moderate to 1.4% when compared with the same period last year. We forecast Hong Kong GDP will grow by 1.5% in 2016 as a whole, slower than 2.4% growth in 2015.

 

HKU

Asian Development Outlook 2016 - Asia’s Potential Growth: Full Report and Highlights. ADB projects 5.7% growth for developing Asia in 2016 and 2017. Global headwinds notwithstanding, developing Asia will continue to contribute 60% of world growth, according to the Asian Development Outlook (ADO) 2016. Modest recovery in Southeast Asia and sustained growth in India will partly offset continued moderation in the People’s Republic of China and the associated spillover into neighboring economies. Risks to the growth outlook tilt to the downside: future US interest rate hikes that may intensify global financial volatility; a sharper-than forecast growth slowdown in the People’s Republic of China that would hurt regional exports and growth; emerging producer price deflation that may undermine growth in some economies; tepid prices for oil and other commodities; and El Niño.

  • Part 1: Rescuing Growth in Uncertain Times
  • Part 2: Asia’s Potential Growth
  • Part 3: Economic Trends and Prospects in Developing Asia:

    Central Asia: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekista.

    East Asia: People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, China Republic of Korea, Mongolia, and Taipei,China.

    South Asia: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

    Southeast Asia: Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam.

    The Pacific: Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands,Timor-Leste, Vanuatu, North Pacific Economies, South Pacific Economies, and Small Island Economies.
 

ADB

Openness and Urbanization: The Case of the People’s Republic of China, March 2016. Urbanization usually occurs with structural transformation driven by a “push” from agricultural productivity growth and a “pull” from industrial productivity growth, and usually the former exceeds the latter. This paper presents a simple model to illustrate how the open policy in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) since 1979 reversed the pattern such that the “pull” effect dominated the “push” effect during the PRC’s structural transformation and urbanization. This model helps explain why the PRC, whose industrial productivity growth exceeds its agricultural productivity growth, has experienced a standard pattern of structural transformation. The paper also demonstrates how a developing country’s business services intensity increases with its urbanization.

 

ADB

Impact of the People’s Republic of China’s Growth Slowdown on Emerging Asia: A General Equilibrium Analysis, March 2016. This paper assesses the potential spillover effects of the PRC’s slowdown on its neighboring economies. As an important global and regional economic power, the PRC’s growth slowdown may cause large spillover effects to its neighboring economies. Using a multi-sectoral global computable general equilibrium model, this paper quantitatively investigates the impacts of a growth slowdown in the PRC for emerging Asian economies through trade linkages. The results suggest that a growth slowdown of 1.6 percentage points in the PRC would bring about a growth deceleration of 0.26 percentage points in developing Asia as a whole. However, the impacts vary dramatically by economy within developing Asia, reflecting their difference in economic and trade structure.

 

ADB

Moderating Growth and Structural Change in the People’s Republic of China: Implications for Asia and Beyond, March 2016. A gradual moderation in growth is currently underway in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). This is the result of a combination of factors, including a shrinking working-age population, the natural process of convergence and rising labor costs, and a structural shift toward consumption-led growth partly encouraged by government. It also reflects continued weakness in external demand and the working out of overcapacity in some sectors...

 

ADB

Housing Policies in Singapore, March 2016. Singapore has developed a unique housing system, with three-quarters of its housing stock built by the Housing & Development Board (HDB) and homeownership financed through Central Provident Fund (CPF) savings. As a result, the country’s homeownership rate of 90% is one of the highest among market economies. At different stages of its economic development, the Government of Singapore was faced with a different set of housing problems. An integrated land–housing supply and financing framework was established in the 1960s to solve the severe housing shortage. By the 1990s, the challenge was that of renewing aging estates and creating a market for HDB transactions. Housing subsidies in the form of housing grants were also introduced...

 

ADB

Forms of Government Decentralization and Institutional Quality: Evidence from a Large Sample of Nations, March 2016. This paper studies the effects of various forms of government decentralization on institutional quality across countries. Using corruption and the shadow economy to proxy for institutional quality, as well as three forms of government decentralization (i.e., virtual, physical, and fiscal), the econometric results show virtual decentralization to be the most effective in improving institutional quality. The effects on transition and countries in Asia are also considered.

 

ADB

The Role of Structural Transformation in the Potential of Asian Economic Growth, March 2016. This paper identifies the pattern of structural change that countries experience as they catch up from low income levels to the economic frontier, and examines how structural change contributes to both labor and total factor productivity. Using data for Asian countries the paper goes on to address the extent and form of structural change and its contribution to productivity growth since 1990, asking what order of magnitude the productivity effects are likely to be as Asian countries converge to the economic structure that characterizes middle-income and high-income countries.

 

ADB

The Determinants of Structural Transformation in Asia: A Review of the Literature, March 2016. This paper reviews the evidence on why the pace of structural transformation has differed widely across countries in Asia, with a specific focus on the People’s Republic of China, India, and Thailand. It argues that both government failures relating to the functioning of labor, land, and product markets, and market failures relating to coordination of investment, credit market imperfections, and human capital formation have been the primary causes of the slow pace of structural transformation in several Asian countries. The paper suggests that a specific focus is needed to reform policies that impede the functioning of labor, land, and product markets as well as on strengthening industrial and education policies to address specific market failures around investment coordination and human capital formation.

 

ADB

Analytical Tools for Measuring Poverty Dynamics: An Application Using Panel Data in the Philippines, March 2016. The Philippines has experienced rapid economic growth over the past decade. However, the benefits of economic expansion have not resulted to significant poverty reduction. This paper aims to measure poverty dynamics and identify the correlates of chronic and transient poverty in the Philippines. Findings suggest that the relative importance of transient poverty increases dramatically as the poverty line decreases or as the poverty measure becomes more sensitive to the welfare of the poorest of the poor.

 

ADB

Strengthening Public Pension Systems in Asia: Proceedings of the 2015 ADB-PPI Conference on Public Pension Systems in Asia, Focus: Cambodia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Viet Nam, and Thailand, Published 2016. Asia’s population is aging and old-age income support and social services is an emerging challenge. Strengthening pension systems in Asia is therefore a key concern for inclusive development in the region. In many Asian countries, pension systems are still inadequate in terms of both coverage and delivery of stipulated benefits. This is particularly so for smaller economies of Cambodia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam—or commonly referred to as CLMVT economies. A number of structural issues such as governance, regulation, and institutional and administrative capacities hinder their development. Well-designed, well-functioning, and sustainable pension systems will promote inclusive growth by supporting old-age income and providing the much-needed social safety net...

 

ADB

Fossil Fuel Subsidies in Asia: Trends, Impacts, and Reforms, Published 2016. Unsustainable budgetary cost of selling oil, gas, and coal at low prices has propelled energy subsidy reform in developing Asian economies. This report measures the size of associated subsidies on these fossil fuels including direct transfers, tax exemptions, subsidized credit, and losses of state enterprises in India, Indonesia, and Thailand. An analysis of complex interactions between economic, social, energy, and environmental issues shows that the initial rise in energy prices due to a reduction or removal of the subsidies will nudge households and businesses to shift to alternative fuels, make investment in clean energy attractive, increase energy supply, reduce energy shortages, and cut greenhouse gas emissions...

 

ADB

Emissions Trading Schemes and Their Linking: Challlenges and Opportunities in Asia and the Pacific, Published 2016. Asia and the Pacific has achieved rapid economic expansion in the recent years and has become a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With more than half of the world’s population and high rates of economic growth, the region is especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change and therefore must play its part in cutting GHG emissions...

 

ADB

Achieving Universal Electricity Access in Indonesia, Published 2016.This report describes Indonesia’s electrification environment and identifies barriers to achieving universal electricity access. Principles drawn from international best practices such as government commitment, enabling institutional environments, adequate and sustainable financing, and stakeholder coordination are discussed in the context of Indonesia’s energy sector. The report gives recommendations for establishing service standards, streamlining financing, setting appropriate targets, and monitoring and evaluation, as well as near-term steps to help achieve universal electricity access.

 

ADB

Net Worth: Australia's Regional Fisheries Engagement, March 2016. This paper argues there’s a need for a whole-of-government approach to Australia’s external fisheries policy that recognises clear linkages between fisheries and foreign, trade, and strategic policy. Extending and complementing current stakeholder engagement practices is the key to this approach. Regional fishery management organisations (RFMOs) and arrangements allow Australia to promote a strong approach on sustainable and responsible fishing practices and develop regional instruments to protect our fish stocks and wider regional interests.

 

ASPI

Time to Start Worrying Again? Cross-Strait Stability After the 2016 Taiwanese Elections, March 2016. The study argues that the Taiwan Strait will remain dangerous and that Canberra needs to pay closer attention to the evolving cross-strait situation. Of crucial importance is the question of whether Australia should support its US ally in a future Taiwan contingency. The report calls for a comprehensive dialogue between Canberra and Washington to avoid a future ‘expectation gap’ on the Taiwan issue. As well, Australia should acknowledge Taiwan’s potentially constructive role in regional maritime territorial disputes. Finally, Canberra should proactively take steps to enhance Taiwan’s regional political and economic integration as a means to contribute to long-term cross-strait stability.

 

ASPI

Japan Versus Europe: The Quest to Build Australia's Future Submarine, February 2016. The building of Australia’s fleet of future submarines is likely to be the largest defence program in this country’s history. It will cost tens of billions of dollars and will run for decades. So it’s little wonder that it’s a recurring topic of interest on the pages of ASPI’s blog The Strategist. Our contributors continue to examine the topic from all angles, and this Strategic Insights collects selected pieces from the past twelve months. The authors are Kym Bergmann, Peter Briggs, Andrew Davies, Julian Kerr, Chris Mather, Hans J Ohff, Terence Roach, Benjamin Schreer, Tony Shepherd, Geoff Slocombe, Mark Thomson and Hugh White.

 

ASPI

The Future of Papua New Guinea: Old Challenges for New Leaders, March 2016. With its vast resources base and young population, the outlook for Papua New Guinea should be positive, but negative trends — in law and order, health, and education — do not augur well for the future. PNG’s next generation of leaders, under pressure to improve both service delivery and the quality of national institutions, should tackle a limited number of problems first to unblock barriers to progress. Australia, which has enduring interests in PNG’s success, should be creative in supporting emerging leaders, through government, private sector, and civil society links, to help them make a real difference.

 

Lowy

North Korea’s Audaciousness Changes the Status-Quo in Northeast Asia, March 2016. Eunjung Lim, lecturer at Johns Hopkins University, explains that “it is noteworthy and encouraging that Washington and Beijing reached an agreement on a draft resolution that was unanimously adopted at the UN Security Council.”

 

EWC

From Catching Up to Forging Ahead in Advanced Manufacturing—Reflections on China’s Future of Jobs, March 2016. This paper explores what we know about possible employment effects of the 10-year plan, issued by the State Council on May 19, 2015, entitled Made in China 2025. MIC2025 was designed to address China’s emerging labor shortage challenge. To achieve this goal, the plan seeks to boost labor productivity through an increased use of robots and through network-based upgrading of the entire industrial value chain and related services. The paper finds that until 2014, manufacturing has acted as an employment absorber in China...

 

EWC

Mega-FTAs and the Trade-Security Nexus: The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), March 2016. The rise of a multiplicity of diverse bilateral free trade agreements (FTAs) has led countries to pursue mega-FTAs to manage the growing complexity of global trade arrangements. The US and China are promoting rival accords: the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which would encompass 800 million people and almost 40 percent of global GDP, is a centerpiece of the Obama Asia Pacific strategy...

 

EWC

Differences / Synergies between Energy Efficiency Test Methods for Refrigerators in APEC Region and with the new IEC 62552, March 2016. This report investigates the different EE requirements and evaluation schemes in APEC economies and compares energy consumption calculation results for refrigerators in various APEC economies. Further, deep survey of test methods in APEC economies has been carried out and analysed, differences of test methods for refrigerators have been identified and key factors affecting the energy consumption have been screened out.

 

APEC

Clean and Efficient Use of Energy and Water Resources - Mapping the Energy-Water Nexus around the Pacific Rim, February 2016. In efforts to better inform the energy-water nexus dialogue, this paper builds on and extends the previously noted work in three important ways. The analysis addresses the 21-member economies of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation which are linked by shared geography and economy. The objective of the mapping is to quantify the energy-water nexus at a subnational level, pinpoint potential vulnerabilities, and identify opportunities for international collaboration.

 

APEC

APEC Workshop on Promoting the Development of Wind Energy, Phase 2 – Public Private Partnership for Wind Energy Development, January 2016. This summary report highlights findings from the workshop which sought to enhance understanding on the use of PPP to develop wind energy. It is also aimed at providing the opportunities for wind energy experts from APEC member economies, wind energy producers and investors (business sector) to share information and good practices on using PPP to remove the obstacles and facilitate the development of wind energy.

 

APEC

APEC Energy Working Group Success Stories, Published 2016. This booklet includes just a few of the many successful activities the EWG has undertaken since its first meeting in 1990. 2015 marks the group's 25th year and 50th meeting.

 

APEC

8th Conference on Good Regulatory Practice, February 2016. On 27 to 28 August 2015, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Sub-Committee on Standards and Conformance held the 8th Conference on Good Regulatory Practice in Cebu City, Philippines in the margins of the Senior Official Meetings (SOM) III. The Conference was led by the Philippines and co-sponsored by Australia, Malaysia, United States and Viet Nam. It gathered experts and participants from the governments and business to reinforce and strengthen the understanding of the elements of good regulatory practices (GRP) and the specific actions that economies have or are taking to implement actions identified by APEC Leaders in 2013.

 

APEC

APEC and the Human Development Agenda, March 2016. Human development is defined by the UNDP as a process of enlarging people’s choices: to lead a long and healthy life; to acquire knowledge; and to have access to resources needed to enjoy a decent standard of living. It focuses on the richness of human lives rather than the richness of economies. Human development is not a new approach: it has been integral to the work undertaken by international development organizations in the past three decades, but it is nevertheless a relatively new approach within APEC...

 

APEC

Workshop Report: Facilitating Trade through Updates on Food Safety Regulatory Standards of APEC Economies, February 2016. The workshop, central and most important activity of the APEC funded project CTI 18 2014A (SCSC), focused on understanding modernization in standards and responsibilities regarding food safety of APEC economies, raising awareness on these topics to facilitate food trade and improve food safety standards, and the manner in which APEC economies are dealing with emerging food safety challenges.

 

APEC

Developing ‘Smart Traveller’ Programmes to Facilitate International Travel in the APEC Region, December 2015. This report looks at ways and measures to develop and implement various modes of the Smart Traveller Programme taking into account the growing number of self-organized travels, travellers' safety and security and the possible difficulties that travellers may face.

 

APEC

The Philippine Economy in 2015 and Prospects for 2016, January-March 2016. PIDS Senior Research Fellow Roehlano Briones provides an assessment of the Philippine economy in 2015 and outlook for the current year in this first issue of the DRN for 2016. Amid global and regional challenges, such as the economic slowdown in big Asian economies and the sharp drop in oil prices, Briones underscores the country's resiliency as exemplified by sustained economic growth, improved capital formation, and sound fiscal balance. The lack of inclusiveness, however, remains a major issue that cannot be solved overnight. But our macroeconomic fundamentals have remained strong despite various risks and shocks...

 

PIDS

Philippine Institute for Development Studies - Policy Notes:  

PIDS

Assessment of the DSWD SEA-K Strategy, Published 2015. This study assesses the effectiveness of the strategy and the complementary interventions of the Sustainable Livelihood Program's Self-Employment Assistance Kaunlaran (SLP SEA-K). The SLP SEA-K uses a microcredit strategy to provide credit access to the poor, improve the ability of the group to borrow, and enable it to engage in income-generating activities...

 

PIDS

Journal of Bhutan Studies  

Bhutan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

APEC Outcomes and Outlook 2015/2016. In 2016, Peru will host APEC under the theme of “Quality Growth and Human Development”. APEC will pursue its agenda through four key priorities: Advance Regional Economic Integration and Quality Growth; Modernize Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprises in the Asia-Pacific; Promote Human Capital Development; and Support the Regional Food Markets. This publication also looks back at the outcomes of APEC Philippines 2015 and the 23rd APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting in Manila, Philippines.

 

APEC

Prospects and Compromise Points of the Arab Spring, November 2015. This research project is intended to evaluate the impact of the socio-political popular movement since 2011, or the so-called “Arab Spring,” on major oil and gas producers in the Middle East region, which hold undeniable and irreplaceable share in the Asia and Pacific energy market.

 

APEC

APEC Oil and Gas Security Exercise Model Procedure, November 2015. This report looks at a step-by-step approach for planning, conducting and evaluating emergency exercises.

 

APEC

The Energy Reform in Mexico - Implications for the Asia-Pacific Region, November 2015. This report examines the Mexico’s oil and gas market, its recent reform and major challenges ahead. In so doing, key potential areas for cooperation between Mexico and other APEC member economies are identified, to pursue APEC’s mission of promoting sustainable economic growth and prosperity by means of open trade and investment.

 

APEC

Oil Supply Security and Emergency Policy in the APEC Region, September 2015. This report highlights the developments and issues on oil and gas security, information on individual economy’s policies related to oil and gas security including responses to emergency situation.

 

APEC

Current Issues in Asia Pacific Foreign Direct Investment, Published 2015. This book aims to stimulate thought and discussion on a number of important issues relating to foreign direct investment (FDI). Each chapter is written by an expert or experts in the field, and each can stand alone in the perspectives it offers on FDI issues. However, taken together, a number of key themes emerge, reflecting policy issues which impact businesses in making FDI and which are being grappled with by government negotiators and regulators...

 

AUAPEC

Asia Bond Monitor, March 2016. Bond yields in most emerging East Asian markets declined between the start of the year and mid-February amid mounting gloom over global growth prospects. The main exceptions to the downward trend were the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and Hong Kong, China. Bond yields also fell in major advanced economies due to subdued inflation and concerns over deflation in some economies. Yields for 10-year local currency (LCY) government bonds in emerging East Asia mostly fell between 1 January and 15 February. Over the same period, most emerging East Asian stock markets also fell, with the only exceptions being in Indonesia, where the market rose, and in Thailand, where the market held steady...

 

ADB

The Housing Market and Housing Policies in Japan, March 2016. Housing policies in Japan after World War II were focused on the quantitative supply of houses with a wide range of targeted groups and public rental houses. The Japan Housing Corporation (now the Urban Renaissance Agency) and the Government Housing Loan Corporation (now the Japan Housing Finance Agency) have served to address these policy targets accordingly. The restoration of housing stock was successful, but the collapse of the property bubble in the early 1990s caused negative impact on the real economy and created persistent loss of confidence among the Japanese people, which is exacerbated by deflation and negative demographic factors (decrease of the population and aging of society). Enhancement of the quality of houses is an important part of the housing policy in Japan, but, at the same time, there needs to be a balance between new construction and the activation of existing housing stocks. Given the social experiments currently underway, there is need to closely monitor the changes of market trends.

 

ADB

Debt Dynamics, Fiscal Deficit, and Stability in Government Borrowing in India: A Dynamic Panel Analysis, March 2016. Despite the initiatives of the Finance Commission of India, fiscal performance has been deteriorating and increasingly diverging across Indian states. Given that the state governments are endowed with expenditure autonomy, this paper investigates whether the composition of expenditure of the subnational governments has an impact on the degree of indebtedness. A panel analysis for the 17 non-special category states over 1980–2013 indicates that apart from the budget structure, the state-specific factors affecting fiscal performance plays an important role in government borrowing. Curiously enough, government borrowing is more responsive to revenue expenditure than capital outlay and has more growth-augmenting effect through revenue expenditure.

 

ADB

Human Capital Development in the People’s Republic of China and India: Achievements, Prospects, and Policy Challenges, Published 2015. This report draws lessons from how Asian economic giants India and the People’s Republic of China leveraged education and skills development to advance economic growth. The analysis presented similarities and differences in human capital development strategies and their outcomes that helped define development pathways between the two countries. It also outlined the prospects for human capital development in the sustainability of the two countries’ economic growth.

 

ADB

Asian Economic Integration Report 2015. Asia’s trade has slowed faster than world trade; trade growth has been below economic growth since 2012. Structural factors such as slower expansion of global value chains and growth moderation in the People’s Republic of China may be at play, but the region must embrace further efforts to make trade and investment regimes more open. Regional trade blocs such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the proposed Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership could facilitate freer trade if supported through open, flexible accession...

 

ADB

Southeast Asia and the Economics of Global Climate Stabilization, Published 2015. New analysis suggests that the impacts of climate change in Southeast Asia may be larger than previously estimated, possibly reaching 11% of gross domestic product by 2100. Southeast Asia is likely to sustain larger economic losses from climate change than most other areas in the world. Moreover, those losses—the collective effect of impacts on agriculture, tourism, energy demand, labor productivity, catastrophic risks, health, and ecosystems—may be larger than previously estimated. When these loss estimates are considered simultaneously in the modeling, gross domestic product (GDP) is found to be reduced by 11% in 2100 under the business as usual emissions scenario of this study, which is 60% higher than the earlier ADB assessment.

 

ADB

Achieving Skill Mobility in the ASEAN Economic Community: Challenges, Opportunities, and Policy Implications, Published 2015.
ASEAN member states face challenges in achieving greater mobility for the highly skilled, including hurdles in recognizing professional qualifications, and opening up access to certain jobs. Despite clear aspirations by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to create an effective and transparent framework to facilitate movements among skilled professionals within the ASEAN by December 2015, progress has been slow and uneven.

 

ADB

Labor Migration in Asia: Building Effective Institutions, Published 2016. This report analyzes the institutions and structures that govern labor migration in Asia. It considers the important role of governments and other stakeholders in both labor-destination countries and labor-sending countries. This report analyzes the institutions and structures that govern labor migration in Asia. It considers the important role of governments and other stakeholders in both labor-destination countries such as Japan, the Republic of Korea, and Singapore, and labor-sending countries such as India, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka. Key issues are the extent to which these structures provide an orderly process for the movement of people between countries and whether the rights and the welfare of workers are protected.

 

ADB

Gender Statistics: The Pacific and Timor-Leste, Published 2016.
Key gender statistics provide a snapshot of gender issues in the Pacific region and Timor-Leste. This booklet promotes the use of gender statistics for evidence-based policy making and monitoring progress in gender equality issues. The Pacific region has made good progress in conducting population and housing censuses and other national surveys, as well as in collecting administrative records by government agencies. The key gender indicators illustrated here should encourage the countries to continue their investment in data collection and in strengthening technical capacity for analysis.

 

ADB

Thematic Review of Credit Underwriting Standards and Practices of Corporate Lending Business, February 2016. The protracted low interest rate environment and increased level of liquidity over
the past years have resulted in a very competitive market and compressed interest margins
for banks. In this environment, some banks may relax loan structures and covenants, and under-price risks in their corporate lending activities. Against this backdrop, the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) conducted a thematic inspection of several banks in Singapore to assess the credit underwriting standards and practices of their corporate lending business...

 

MAS

Capital Markets Enforcement, January 2016. This monograph sets out the aims of MAS’ enforcement function, MAS’ enforcement approach and how its philosophy of early detection and rectification of breaches; shaping business and market conduct; and effective deterrence is applied in our daily enforcement work. It provides an overview of the importance of an effective market enforcement regime, the agencies responsible for capital markets enforcement in Singapore and explains our powers as well as the spectrum of enforcement actions that MAS and other authorities can take to combat market misconduct.

 

MAS

International Journal of Korean Studies, Volume XIX, Number 1, 2015  

IJKS

The U.S.-Malaysia Security Connection, February 2016. Marvin Ott and Derek Maseloff, Senior Scholar and Research Assistant, respectively, at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, explain that “There is little doubt that [Malaysian Prime Minister] Najib understands the implications of Chinese ambitions and methods. He also understands the critical importance of the U.S. as a counterweight to China.”

 

EWC

Japan-Taiwan Relations in the New DPP Era, February 2016. Yasuhiro Matsuda, Professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, University of Tokyo, explains that “It is quite natural for Tokyo and Taipei to strengthen their relations after Tsai Ing-wen’s inauguration. However, Beijing is watching their relations closely and cautiously.”

 

EWC

Islamic State Propaganda and the Mainstream Media, February 2016. Islamic State’s use of social media to disseminate its propaganda is generally well understood. What receives far less attention is how the group also uses the Western mainstream media to spread its key messages. Islamic State tailors the production and release of its material to the needs of mainstream media outlets and to the media cycle. The danger involved in sending Western journalists to Syria and Iraq has made the media more reliant on material produced by Islamic State. The group’s propaganda is often unwittingly used by the mainstream media in ways that serve Islamic State’s objectives...

 

Lowy

Trends in Southeast Asia 2016 #2: Middle Eastern Influences on Islamist Organizations in Malaysia: The Cases of ISMA, IRF and HTM. Interaction between Muslims in Malaysia and their Middle Eastern brethren has consistently been a source of apprehension to the powers-that-be from colonial times till today. Islamist activism in Malaysia has indeed undergone changes, and these did indeed arise from contemporary Middle Eastern influences. The religious thought, practices and lifestyles of Muslims in Malaysia have traditionally been regarded as moderate. Of particular importance in the present context is the transmission of puritanical interpretations of Islam...

 

ISEAS

In Search of a Better Match: Qualification Mismatches in Developing Asia, February 2016. This paper examines the extent to which various factors explains talent misallocation in the form of qualification mismatches across six urban developing Asian economies using the World Bank’s Skills towards Employability and Productivity (STEP) Skills Measurement Survey. This paper empirically tests the role of search frictions in driving qualification mismatches in the labor market. Using new data from several low-income economies in urban Asia we find that overeducation in less developed labor markets are more pervasive than in more developed economies.

 

ADB

A Model of Gender Inequality and Ecomoic Growth, February 2016. The role of women in economic development has been a popular topic in academic and policy debates. The last half century has witnessed a drastic increase in labor participation of women in most developed and developing countries. However, there is still significant underutilization and misallocation of women’s skills and talents. In many developing countries, inequality in access to quality education between girls and boys adversely impacts girls’ ability to build human and social capital, lowering their job opportunities and wage in labor markets.

 

ADB

Female Labor Force Participation in Asia: Indonesia Country Study, February 2016. This paper uses over 20 years of data from Indonesia’s labor force survey to study trends in and constraints to female labor force participation. We also survey existing evidence, identify data gaps, and outline a research policy evaluation of female-centered vocational training and job placement services, which may be effective tools to increase female labor force participation.

 

ADB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February, 2016

 

Source

 

 

 

 

G20 Monitor: The Chinese 2016 G20 Host Year, February 2016. There are high expectations for the 2016 Chinese G20 Presidency, following an underwhelming 2015 in which the G20 has had limited impact on economic growth outcomes and little influence on multilateral and regional developments. To translate China’s vision of an innovative, invigorated, interconnected, and inclusive global economy into success, G20 countries need to demonstrate greater political will in acting to address near-term economic challenges. At the same time, the G20 needs to maintain a sense of continuity and demonstrate real progress on longer-term matters of economic governance.

 

Lowy

APEC Petroleum Product Trading and Security, November 2015. Demand for petroleum products in the APEC region, particularly in the ASEAN region, has been increasing significantly. While the expansion of refining facilities is underway, demand still outstrips supply, and imports from outside the region remain high. This research study aims analysing how the supply and demand balance of petroleum products in the region would change over the period of 2011 to 2020 and identify problems and issues while considering their impacts.

 

APEC

Policy Review for APEC Low Carbon Model Town Phase 4 - Final Report, January 2016. To assist the city develop its plans, and become a model for other towns, San Borja is the site of a two part APEC peer-review led by the Asia Pacific Energy Research Centre (APERC). Part 1 of the review contains background information on San Borja and provides context to Part 2, – which is produced by the review team. The findings and 50 recommendations for implementation in this policy review are grouped by topic: legal framework, urban planning, low carbon buildings, energy management, energy efficiency, transport and environmental planning.

 

APEC

Final Project Completion Report: High Level Private-Public Forum on Cold Chain to Strengthen Agriculture & Food's Gloabl Value Chain, December 2015. The development of the cold chain, which connects production, storage, processing, distribution in cold, leads to achieving food security and promoting global value chain, which results in the empowering agriculture in APEC region. This report aims to understand the current situations and the benefits of cold chain systems, identify best practices on establishment of cold chains and share experiences and knowledge regarding cold chain system among the APEC economies.

 

APEC

Low-Carbon Model Town - Phase 5 (Feasibility Study), November 2015. This report focuses on a low carbon development strategy (LCDS) and implementation roadmap for an industrial greenfield development in the Special Economic Zone (SEZ) in Bitung, Indonesia. It includes a comprehensive feasibility study and detailed implementation action plans for a set of proposed high potential low carbon mitigation measures (LCMs), including recommendations on the institutional and regulatory framework, thoughts on the required financial architecture, and potential funding sources to achieve the proposed LCDS for the SEZ Bitung.

 

APEC

Follow-up Peer Review on Energy Efficiency in the Philippines, November 2014. This follow-up report examines the progress made and challenges encountered by the Philippines in implementing recommendations of the earlier APEC Peer Review on Energy Efficiency. This latest report makes further recommendations on overarching energy efficiency policies as well recommendations for sector specific actions to boost energy efficiency in the sugar, glass, cement and commercial buildings industries, drawing on best practices and innovative approaches from around the world.

 

APEC

Australia–China Cyber Relations in the Next Internet Era, December 2015. ASPI has worked closely with the China Institute of International Studies (CIIS) to advance discussion on cyber policy, and several viable policy initiatives are proposed in this report. Cybersecurity is a first-order national security issue, and ICT networks are critical for Australia’s digital future and economic prosperity. Common ground between Australia and China on cyber policy is thin, and there’s disagreement on many issues. But closer dialogue is needed to find opportunities to cooperate on shared threats and to limit the likelihood for misadventure. This special report is a building block for that discussion.

 

ASPI

Mission Command and C3 Modernisation in the Australian Army: Digitisation a Critical Enabler, December 2015. ASPI hosted an Army Digitisation Roundtable to continue a conversation with industry, commenced by the Australian Army, about the Army’s approach to mission command and C3 (command, control, communications) modernisation. The roundtable, was a closed-door discussion under the Chatham House rule between key stakeholders from the Army, the Department of Defence, academia and industry. This report is the authors’ summary of the discussion.

 

ASPI

Trends in Southeast Asia 2016 #1: Making Sense of the Election Results in Myanmar’s Rakhine and Shan States. This paper examines why ethnic parties did well in Rakhine and Shan States despite the fact that the National League for Democracy (NLD) was given a manifest mandate by the Myanmar electorate to represent its interests nationwide. In Rakhine State, the electorate chose the Arakan National Party (ANP) over the other parties because of the fear that their cultural identity and right to govern themselves are threatened by Bamar political and cultural hegemony and Muslim/South Asian encroachment from the western border...

 

ISEAS

Infrastructure Investment, Private Finance, and Institutional Investors: Asia from a Global Perspective, January 2016. This study evaluates infrastructure investment and finance in Asia from a global perspective. It provides an overview on infrastructure needs and the various sources of private finance, globally and within Asia, and creates a “bigger picture” for the demand and supply of capital for infrastructure by using a simple framework, i.e., percentages of gross domestic product. The picture is expectedly not uniform across Asia, but some interesting features emerge from global comparisons. Overall, the private sector still plays a relatively subdued role. Bank loans dominate private infrastructure finance, and there is much scope for the further development of capital markets...

 

ADB

Urbanization and Inequality in Hypertension Diagnosis and Medication in Indonesia, January 2016. Urbanization has been progressing quickly in Indonesia and the consequences on health and health inequities are still not well understood. In this paper, we present new empirical evidence on the differences in the utilization of health care services between rural and urban areas as well as for the respective health inequities. Exploiting the rich dataset of the Indonesian Family Life Survey, this paper measures the socioeconomic inequality of health care utilization for the case of the diagnosis of hypertension and its medication...

 

ADB

Impact of Gender Inequality on the Republic of Korea’s Long-Term Economic Growth: An Application of the Theoretical Model of Gender Inequality and Economic Growth, January 2016. Calibrating a gender inequality growth model to fit Korean data, we find that policies that seek to reduce gender discrimination in the labor market or increase the time spent by fathers on child-rearing can contribute positively to female labor market participation and to the Republic of Korea’s per capita income growth. When gender disparities at home and in the labor market are completely removed, the female labor force participation rate is shown to increase from 54.4% to 67.5%, and the per capita income growth rate from 3.6% to 4.1% on average over a generation.

 

ADB

Women’s Leadership and Corporate Performance, January 2016. Is leadership diversified in Asian corporate boardrooms? How is gender diversity in corporate leadership associated with financial performance? What is the magnitude of potential gain by allocating human talents more efficiently without gender bias? What kind of policy might be useful to improve the gender diversity in corporate leadership? This paper provides insights into these questions through theoretical review and empirical analyses. It examines the gender diversity in corporate boardrooms in Asia and the Pacific and how the diversity affects corporate performance.

 

ADB

Policy Notes:  

PIDS

Economic Issue of the Day:  

PIDS

Development Research News:  

PIDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asserting Statehood: Kazakhstan’s Role in International Organizations, December 2015. Since the fall of the Soviet Union, Kazakhstan has developed a record of being the most proactive and innovative former Soviet republic in the sphere of international cooperation. Kazakhstan’s multilateral relations have always expressed a clear logic: to establish itself as a reliable and constructive international actor. The core of this strategy has been to create several foreign policy pillars – Russia, China, the U.S., the EU, Turkey – without prioritizing one too heavily over the other. However, in recent years the Russian pillar has expanded heavily, thus compromising the delicate balance of Kazakhstan's multi-vector foreign policy...

 

ISDP

The EU, Central Asia, and the Development of Continental Transport and Trade, December 2015. Since the collapse of the USSR, a number of initiatives have embarked, separately or together, on the momentous task of rebuilding trade and transportation arteries across Central Asia and the Caucasus. The underlying logic has been two-fold: by reconnecting the landlocked new states of the region to their neighbors and historic trading partners, the heart of Asia can become a land corridor connecting Europe to Asia. This paper plots out the main lines of transport and trade development in Central Asia and their potential for both regional states and the European Union...

 

ISDP

Happiness and Government: The Role of Public Spending and Governance Effectiveness, July 2015. We apply ordered probit regressions on World Value Survey data, government spending data, public governance data, the median age of countries, etc., covering wave 5 and wave 6 that encompass 78 countries. We use two alternative and entirely new methods to identify optimal government spending. We found that, on average, countries under-spend on healthcare and over-spend on education...

 

LINHK

 

Food Security and Small Landholders in South Asia, Published 2015. This paper surveys the status of food security in the South Asian countries, particularly India. Particular attention has been paid to small landholders (those households owning less than 2 hectares of land). Using NSS data from 1993-94 and 2004-05 the paper shows that small landholders are an increasing proportion of i) total rural households, ii) rural households who are poor, and iii) rural households who are undernourished. The paper then singles out five disconnects in India’s recent economic performance as constituting the reason for this outcome...

 

ASARC

Hong Kong: High Frequency Macroeconomic Forecasts Current Quarter Model: 2016Q1, January 2016. According to its High Frequency Macroeconomic Forecast, real GDP is estimated to grow by 2.0% in 15Q4, when compared with the same period in 2014. It is estimated to growth by 2.4% for the year of 2015 as a whole. In 16Q1, real GDP growth is forecast to be 1.8% when compared with the same period last year. We expect Hong Kong GDP is likely to grow below 2.0% in the year of 2016, slower than 2015.

 

HKU

MAS Survey of Professional Forecasters, December 2015. The December 2015 Survey was sent out on 25 November 2015 to a total of 28 economists and analysts who closely monitor the Singapore economy. This report reflects the views received from 22 respondents (a response rate of 79%) and does not represent MAS’ views or forecasts. GDP growth in Q3 2015 was weaker than expected. The Singapore economy expanded by 1.9% in Q3 2015 compared with the same period last year. This was lower than the median forecast of 2.1% reported in the Sep 2015 Survey. For 2015 as a whole, the economy is forecast to expand by 1.9%. The respondents expect the economy to grow by 1.9% in 2015, a decline from the 2.2% median forecast in the previous survey...

 

MAS

MAS Financial Stability Review, November 2015. Uneven growth and divergent monetary policies across the G3 pose risks to financial stability in Asia and Singapore. At the same time, weak commodity prices have put strains on commodity-related firms with knock-on effects on banks, financial markets, sovereign balance sheets, and economies. Recent geopolitical developments could fuel further uncertainty. Meanwhile, China faces a delicate balance between near-term economic performance and asset market stability on the one hand and longer-term structural reforms on the other. Strong intra-regional linkages could increase contagion from a China-related shock, while subdued regional growth adds to headwinds in Asia. Singapore’s financial system remains sound, but industry must stand vigilant against rising risks...

 

MAS

Black Flag Rising: ISIL in Southeast Asia and Australia, December 2015. Although the prime focus of Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has been on establishing a state—a caliphate—in the Middle East, it has also sought to gain a presence beyond that area. Southeast Asia is one region that’s now receiving increased attention as a potential beachhead for the group. Most concern has focused on Malaysia, Indonesia, the southern Philippines and the Malay Muslim provinces of Thailand. The paper considers how these nations are responding to the threat. Beyond Southeast Asia, ISIL is showing a growing influence in Australia. The measures the Australian Government are taking have been generally well received. However, a number of concerns have been raised about the pace and nature of Australia’s emergent counterterrorist strategy and their implications for the nation’s democratic character.

 

ASPI

Trends in Southeast Asia 2015 #21: The Politics of the United States-China-Vietnam Triangle in the 21st Century. Vietnams balancing of power act, namely the policy of seeking a counterweight to the China threat, and the politics of the U.S.VietnamChina triangle, may have taken shape in the early years of the twenty-first century, but it was deeply rooted in the changing relations between the big powers in the 1980s and Vietnams need to adjust its policy to these changes. A combination of factors geographical proximity, ideological affinity, and the need for regime survival tends to make Vietnamese leaders more comfortable with China than with the United States...

 

ISEAS

Obama Doubles-down on Maritime Capacity Building in Southeast Asia, December 2015. Lyle J. Morris, Project Associate at the RAND Corporation, explains that “By contributing to coast guard capacity building by donating ships and funding, the United States has found an important and politically viable avenue to bolster maritime security to partners and allies in the region.”

 

EWC

ASEAN and Its SMEs – A New Opportunity? December 2015. Ganeshan Wignaraja, Advisor in the Economic Research and Regional Cooperation Department at the Asian Development Bank, explains that “In an era of moderating growth, ASEAN and its SMEs involved in supply chains represent an opportunity for investors and for sustaining growth.”

 

EWC

The Japan Coast Guard (JCG) as a Foreign Policy Instrument in Southeast Asia, December 2015. Miha Hribernik, Non-Resident WSD-Handa Fellow with Pacific Forum CSIS, explains that “As Japan’s strategic competition with China intensifies, the Japanese Coast Guard is moving to the forefront of Tokyo’s growing security cooperation with Southeast Asia.”

 

EWC

El Nino Strengthens in the Pacific: Preparing for the Impacts of Drought, December 2015. A drought is moving through the Pacific Islands, brought by one of the strongest El Niño events since record keeping began 60 years ago. It started in the southwest Pacific, where it has brought famine to Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu. It is expected to reach the South Pacific, tropical West Pacific, and Hawaiian Islands between December 2015 and May 2016, potentially affecting 4.7 million people...

 

EWC

Alternative Waste Solutions for the Pacific Region: Learning from the Hawai'i Experience, November 2015. With limited space and ever-growing trash, the islands of the Pacific share unique challenges managing their solid wastes. The traditional approach has been to collect waste in open dumps and landfills. But overwhelmed sites and unsanitary conditions are driving governments to seek alternative solutions...

 

EWC

Unconventional Monetary Policy, Spillovers, and Liftoff: Implications for Northeast Asia, November 2015. Unconventional monetary policy (UMP) has had predictable effects. How exit plays out is scenario-dependent. Quantitative easing has had the predictable effect of encouraging currency depreciation and some partner countries may have attempted to offset these exchange rate effects. Korea presents a particularly interesting case: it is relatively small and relatively open and integrated, in both trade and financial terms, with the United States and Japan, two practitioners of UMP...

 

EWC

Causes and Remedies for Japan’s Long-Lasting Recession: Lessons for the People’s Republic of China, December 2015. Japan has suffered from sluggish economic growth and recession since the early 1990s. In this paper, we analyze the causes of the prolonged slowdown of the Japanese economy (the lost decade). Economics Nobel laureate Paul Krugman has argued that Japan’s lost decade is an example of a liquidity trap. However, our empirical analysis shows that stagnation of the Japanese economy comes from its vertical IS curve rather than a horizontal LM curve, so the Japanese economy faces structural problems rather than a temporary downturn...

 

ADB

Asian Economic Integration Report 2015: How Can Special Economic Zones Catalyze Economic Development? Published 2015. Special economic zones (SEZs) can play a catalytic role in economic development, provided the right business environment and policies are put in place. In Asia, SEZs can facilitate trade, investment, and policy reform at a time the region is experiencing a slowdown in trade and economic growth. The Asian Economic Integration Report is an annual review of Asia’s regional economic cooperation and integration. It covers the 48 regional members of the Asian Development Bank.

 

ADB

Managing the Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy: Perspectives, Policies, and Practices from Asia, Published 2015. The aim of this study is to share the experiences of developed Asian economies and the lessons they have learned. The book assesses the low-carbon and green policies and practices taken by developed Asian countries, identifies gaps, and examines new opportunities for low-carbon green growth.

 

ADB

Uncovering Value Added in Trade: New Approaches to Analyzing Global Value Chains, Published 2015. This book is a collection of research papers on new approaches to measure trade in value added and the role of global value chains in modern international trade. It introduces the input output method for measuring trade and a direct approach for measuring the domestic value added of the People's Republic of China — the center of global assembly. In addition, it shows how to analyze trade relations in the context of global value chains.

 

ADB

Constraints to Indonesia's Economic Growth, December 2015. In the near–term, growth is likely to be influenced by continuing weaknesses in global economic activity, weak international commodity prices, and rising foreign financing costs. In the medium–term, however, Indonesia’s growth prospects are good. Rising domestic demand, productivity improvement, increased urbanization, the shift of labor from agriculture to manufacturing and service sector activity, and increased trade and investment flows should drive higher rates of economic growth and development.

 

ADB

Summary of Indonesia's Finance Sector Assessment, December 2015. Financial sector development is critical for reducing poverty through better access to financial products and services for the poor and low-income families. The Indonesian financial sector remains small and far more dominated by banks than its regional peers. Some of the reasons for the small size of the overall financial sector are: fragmented regulatory structure; regulatory framework not in line with international best practices; and an enabling environment that is less conducive to financial sector development, including lack of diversity in capital market products.

 

ADB

Summary of Indonesia's Energy Sector Assessment, December 2015. Indonesia has coal resources at around 120.5 billion tons, proven oil resources at around 3.69 billion barrels, and proven natural gas reserves at around 101.54 trillion cubic feet. This translates into about 23 remaining years of oil reserves, 59 years of gas, and 146 years of coal at current production rates. Indonesia’s renewable energy sources are also considerable. The country is endowed with significant potential for hydropower, micro/mini hydropower, solar, biomass, and wind, and holds 40% of the world’s geothermal reserves...

 

ADB

Malaria Elimination, Published 2015. The Regional Malaria and Other Communicable Disease Threats Trust Fund supports developing member countries in developing multi-country, cross-border, and multisector responses to urgent malaria and other communicable disease issues...

 

ADB

Thailand: Industrialization and Economic Catch-Up, Published 2015.
This report identifies some of Thailand’s critical development constraints and discusses policy measures and economic reforms needed to accelerate economic transformation toward a more modern and service-oriented economy. Thailand’s economic and social transformation of the last 50 years has placed it in the ranks of upper middle-income countries and made it an integral part of global value chains. It has also established itself as a regional hub for key transport and logistics, with a world-class airport...

 

ADB

Promoting Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage through Carbon Dioxide-Enhanced Oil Recovery in the People’s Republic of China, Published 2015. Injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) to improve the recovery of oil from a depleted oil well is a proven process commonly known as carbon dioxide–enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR). Since most of the injected CO2 will be permanently isolated from the atmosphere, capturing CO2 from an industrial plant (including power plants) and utilizing it for CO2-EOR is commonly known as carbon capture, utilization, and storage and is an effective approach to mitigate CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel based plants...

 

ADB

Addressing Climate Change Risks, Disasters, and Adaptation in the People’s Republic of China, Published 2015. It is vital for countries to identify climate risks, reduce these risks through mitigation, and adapt to these risks—thereby increasing resilience and reducing vulnerability. This study informs decision makers regarding major climate change risks to development and provides feasible policy recommendations for consideration to increase resilience and reduce vulnerability in the water, agriculture, and natural resource sectors of the People’s Republic of China.

 

ADB

Achieving Environmental Sustainability in Myanmar, December 2015.Myanmar’s long isolation from international markets and sources of finance historically limited development, and thus, the pressure on its environment. Many of its resources remain relatively intact, despite an absence of effective environmental regulations. Yet, as the country integrates into the global economy and its economic development accelerates, resource degradation is rising rapidly. This paper aims to identify current and future environmental problems in Myanmar, the pressures underpinning them, and the policy measures that can manage them.

 

ADB

Public Debt Sustainability in Developing Asia: An Update, December 2015. The paper updates debt sustainability analysis (DSA) for developing Asia, conducted in 2011. With the benefit of hindsight, the accuracy of the earlier debt ratio forecasts and underlying macroeconomic assumptions is assessed...

 

ADB

Myanmar Human Capital Development, Employment, and Labor Markets, December 2015. Human capital is one of the core prerequisites for rapid, sustainable, and inclusive economic growth. Investments in health and education—including technical and vocational education and training—will be essential to engineer a productive labor force in Myanmar while ensuring that all population segments can contribute to and benefit from growth. This paper focuses on developing human capital, with a focus on health and education in the context of employment growth and an employment-enabling environment.

 

ADB

Myanmar’s Agriculture Sector: Unlocking the Potential for Inclusive Growth, December 2015. With extensive land, water, and labor resources, as well as proximity to fast-growing markets, the country’s agriculture has key competitive advantages. This paper proposes key actions to address agricultural constraints including improving land tenure, expanding credit availability, investing in input markets for nutrients and machinery, developing drainage and irrigation systems, and enhancing rural transport and electricity connectivity. This was written as a background paper for the ADB Myanmar Country Diagnostics Study.

 

ADB

Nowcasting Indonesia, December 2015. We produce predictions of the current state of the Indonesian economy by estimating a Dynamic Factor Model on indicators closely watched by market operators over the period of 2002–2014. Besides the standard difficulties associated with constructing timely indicators of current economic conditions, Indonesia presents additional challenges typical to emerging market economies where data are often scant and unreliable. By means of a pseudo-real-time forecasting exercise, we show that our predictions are comparable to those of market operators. Careful selection of indicators is also shown to be crucial for better forecast performance when data quality is low

 

ADB

Innovations in Knowledge and Learning for Competitive Higher Education in Asia and the Pacific, Published 2015. Higher education institutions in Asia and the Pacific, modelled on industrial age thinking that demands excellence in routinized capacities, lack the ability to innovate and create new knowledge enterprises. The transition to a knowledge economy is affecting the purpose, content, pedagogy, and methodologies of higher education. Nontraditional stakeholders such as professional bodies, industry experts, think tanks, research institutes, and field experts/practitioners are now involved not only in planning but in providing higher education services. The traditional model of “knowledge versus skills” is no longer relevant. Higher education programs must consider lived experiences, contextual knowledge, and indigenous knowledge.

 

ADB

Integrated Information and Communication Technology Strategies for Competitive Higher Education in Asia and the Pacific, Published 2015. Higher education institutions must adopt an institution-wide, holistic information and communication technology (ICT) strategy, not a project-based approach, to avoid redundancies, obsolescence, and large maintenance costs. A coordinated top-down plus bottom-up intervention is best, with three areas requiring attention: infrastructure, application software, and staff development. ICT investments in higher education institutions in support of teaching, research, and community engagement are essential for developing and retaining competitive advantage in the knowledge economy.

 

ADB

A Review and Evaluation of Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Labeling and Consumer Information Programs, November 2015. The report is based on desk-based research into the literature concerning VFEL and a survey of 18 economies (13 of which are members of APEC). The aim was to identify components of VFEL, and best practice within each component. These findings were then used to evaluate existing VFEL programs in order to highlight areas in which individual programs met or fell short of best practice.

 

APEC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

  

 
 

View Previous Highlights