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ASPI Strategy Reports

 

 

 

 

   
 
ASPI publishes longer studies on issues of critical importance to Australia and the region. Current year back to 2004.
 

Tiptoeing Around the Nine-Dash Line: Southeast Asia After Asean, February 2017. Southeast Asia is one of the most diverse regions on the planet, and its geopolitical importance is on the rise. While individual states in this part of the world have been strategically significant in the past, Southeast Asia now finds itself thrust into the limelight of international affairs as a result of the competition currently occurring between the US and China. Those developments have placed greater strategic weight and heightened attendant stresses on the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the principal group representing the 10 countries in the region. Even as ASEAN’s strategic pertinence steadily increases, the member states of the grouping face a dilemma over collective action that challenges not only perceptions of ASEAN’s efficacy but also the overall security of Southeast Asia. How they and other interested actors—including the People’s Republic of China (PRC), the US, Australia and Japan—choose to act now will shape the region for decades to come...

Dragon and Eagle Entangled: Sino-US Military Exchanges, 2001–2016, January 2017. US–China military exchanges constitute an important aspect of bilateral relations between the reigning superpower and a fast-rising one. This ASPI Strategy takes stock of Sino-US military contacts over the past 15 years and provides some preliminary assessments of the evolution and implications of this critical aspect of perhaps the most important bilateral relationship in the world today. It seeks to achieve three objectives. First, it identifies, compares and discusses the rationales, expectations and approaches of the two militaries regarding the relationship. Second, it outlines and reviews bilateral Sino-US military contacts from 2001 to 2016, essentially covering both the George W Bush and Barack Obama administrations. Third, it analyses and evaluates US–China military ties over this period and provides some explanations of their promises, progress and pitfalls.

After Mosul: Australia's Strategy to Counter the Islamic State, December 2016. As the battle for Mosul unfolds in Iraq, Australian policymakers must carefully consider Australia’s long-term objectives in the Middle East. One critical question needs to be answered because it’s central to the process of making strategy. What is the Australian policy objective: to what end are our forces there? Once that question is answered, we can decide what comes next. The world has watched the Islamic State (IS) evolve from a regional insurgency to a proto-state and global terrorist organisation that poses a significant threat to Australia’s national security. In the future, the group is likely to revert to insurgency operations to ensure its survival, but the global terrorist threat will remain...

Defence White Papers at 40, December 2016. The Defence White Paper brought down earlier this year (DWP 2016), the seventh of its kind, appeared shortly before the 40th anniversary of the first, which was tabled in parliament by the Defence Minister, James (later Sir James) Killen, in November 1976. For a governmental practice as for an individual, a 40th anniversary is a good time to stand back and assess the past, present and future...

America's 'Maginot Line': A Study of Static Border Security in an Age of Agile and Innovative Threats, November 2016. Borders and border security are once again becoming increasingly important to the nation state. Many take a default position that our coastline is our border and that border security involves merely police, security guards and immigration or customs officials. But Australia’s geography no longer provides the physical barrier from the outside world that it once did. This strategy provides a case study analysis of post-9/11 changes to US border security policies. It examines each of America’s different borders: the friendly northern borders, maritime borders, and the militarised southern border. It provides recommendations for Australia’s border security.

From Hollywood to Bollywood? Recasting Australia’s Indo/Pacific Strategic Geography, October 2016. Australia’s strategic geography is being revolutionised. China and India’s rising maritime power, coupled with a Eurasia-wide ‘connectivity revolution’, is drawing together two formerly disparate theatres: the Asia–Pacific and the Indian Ocean region. This report argues against the Indo-Pacific idea and presents the case for a more regionally differentiated ‘Indo/Pacific’ alternative. The hyphen at the heart of the Indo-Pacific aggregates two distinct regional security orders that have differed widely in their historical evolution and that today present different challenges and regional order-building opportunities for Australia...

Improving on Zero: Australia and India Attempt Strategic Convergence, August 2016. India no longer sees Australia as merely a strategic stooge of the US. And Australia is starting to accord India the importance India always saw as its right. Those are big changes in attitude and policy—and in the two countries’ understanding of each other’s interests. Strategy: The Australia–India strategic relationship was in zero territory—often in negative mode—for much of the 20th century; indeed, effectively since India’s independence. In the 21st century, though, Australia and India can reach for greater strategic convergence. People: Australia in the 21st century can have a set of relationships with India based on people as much as on economic and strategic need. Economics and trade: As China slows economically, Australia turns to India...

The Eagle Has Landed: The US Rebalance to Southeast Asia, June 2016. Early in his administration, President Barack Obama announced the ‘Asia rebalance’, a US reorientation that became official policy in January 2012. This so-called ‘pivot’ explicitly recognises the need for America to re-embrace partner nations in Asia, leveraging their significant and growing capabilities to build a network of states that nurtures, strengthens and sustains a rules-based order that’s capable of effectively addressing regional challenges. The fundamental question is whether the US will continue with its current ASEAN-centric policy as part of a broader program of Asian engagement. Assuming that the rebalance survives, it’s clear that a central challenge will be convincing China that the return to Southeast Asia isn’t a thinly veiled strategy of Sino-containment but, rather, an effort to revitalise and strengthen partnerships in a key part of the world. The optimal and most sustainable outcome will be the emergence of a regional order that promotes risk-averse behaviour by Beijing and insulates against the type of unilateral action that could quickly escalate out of control to threaten American and local allied interests.

Why Russia Is a Threat to the International Order, June 2016. Almost a quarter of a century after the demise of the USSR, Russia is back on the world stage and in a familiar, threatening manner. There can be no doubt that Putin’s Russia is now seeking to reassert itself as a major power. It seems set on a path to confrontation with the West and is now challenging the established post-World War II security order in Europe. This paper analyses Russia’s geopolitical ambitions, its military modernisation, the threat it poses to the international order and how the West should respond. It estimates the prospects for the Russian economy to assess how economic weakness might affect Russian behaviour. It concludes by addressing Moscow’s strategic priorities in the Asia–Pacific region and the implications of Russia’s rise for Australia.

Agenda for Change 2016: Strategic Choices for the Next Government, June 2016. The defence of Australia's interests is a core business of federal governments. Regardless of who wins the election on July 2, the incoming government will have to grapple with a wide range of security issues. This report provides a range of perspectives on selected defence and national security issues, as well as a number of policy recommendations. Contributors include Kim Beazley, Peter Jennings, Graeme Dobell, Shiro Armstrong and ASPI analysts. ASPI produced a similar brief before the 2013 election. There are some enduring challenges, such as cybersecurity, terrorism and an uncertain global economic outlook. Natural disasters are a constant feature of life on the Pacific and Indian Ocean rim...

Net Worth: Australia's Regional Fisheries Engagement, March 2016. This paper argues there’s a need for a whole-of-government approach to Australia’s external fisheries policy that recognises clear linkages between fisheries and foreign, trade, and strategic policy. Extending and complementing current stakeholder engagement practices is the key to this approach. Regional fishery management organisations (RFMOs) and arrangements allow Australia to promote a strong approach on sustainable and responsible fishing practices and develop regional instruments to protect our fish stocks and wider regional interests.

Black Flag Rising: ISIL in Southeast Asia and Australia, December 2015. Although the prime focus of Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has been on establishing a state—a caliphate—in the Middle East, it has also sought to gain a presence beyond that area. Southeast Asia is one region that’s now receiving increased attention as a potential beachhead for the group. Most concern has focused on Malaysia, Indonesia, the southern Philippines and the Malay Muslim provinces of Thailand. The paper considers how these nations are responding to the threat. Beyond Southeast Asia, ISIL is showing a growing influence in Australia. The measures the Australian Government are taking have been generally well received. However, a number of concerns have been raised about the pace and nature of Australia’s emergent counterterrorist strategy and their implications for the nation’s democratic character.

Beyond 2017: The Australian Defence Force and Amphibious Warfare, July 2015. The delivery of Australia’s new amphibious warships, HMAS Canberra and Adelaide, is an important milestone in the ADF’s quest to develop a strategically relevant amphibious warfare capability. Australia’s position in the world makes the effort a strategic imperative, but the ADF still has a long way to go and many critical decisions ahead if it’s to develop an amphibious warfare capability that’s ready for future challenges. The resources committed to the effort and the associated opportunity costs have been and will be substantial, and the overall need for the capability must be weighed against other priorities, but if Australia’s going to do it, we should do it properly...

Gen Y Jihadists: Preventing Radicalisation in Australia, June 2015. In September 2014 the terrorism threat level was raised from ‘medium’ to ‘high’ – the first change in 13 years. This year, the government estimated that the number of high risk terrorist threats being monitored by security agencies had doubled and that more than 100 Australians were fighting for groups in Syria and Iraq. A team of ASPI analysts has examined the scope and nature of terrorism motivated by violent Islamist extremism in Australia through a comprehensive database of the high-profile Australians identified as foreign fighters and those that have come to the attention of authorities in Australia. Based on the findings from this research, the paper assesses the policy responses by the government to date and offers recommendations.

Learning from History: Some Strategic Lessons from the 'Forward Defence' Era, May 2015. Australia is currently engaged in a major reassessment of its strategic policy. Those in and around the policymaking process are trying to define the nation’s core values and interests, to identify the most likely threats, and to frame a strategy that will best protect and promote our national security. This is happening at a time when many defence budgets are severely constrained...

ASEAN Ascending: Achieving 'Centrality' in the Emerging Asian Order, March 2015. One factor that’s likely to bear heavily on the future trajectory of the proposed ASEAN Community is the influence of an increasingly assertive government in Beijing. The People’s Republic of China (PRC) is now the pre-eminent power in Southeast Asia. To be successful, the ASEAN Community will also require considerable backing from the US—the other major power in Southeast Asia. Ultimately, it will be up to ASEAN itself to achieve centrality and thereby remain a relevant player in the emerging Asian order.

Strike from the Air: The First 100 Days of the Campaign against ISIL, December 2014. This report is the first publication from a continuing, open-source study of the coalition campaign against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). With Australian blood and treasure committed to the efforts of the coalition, it is important for ASPI to provide research and constructive commentary on the campaign...

Expanding Alliance: ANZUS Cooperation and Asia–Pacific Security, December 2014. The alliance between Australia and the US, underpinned by the formal ANZUS Treaty of 1951, continues to be a central part of Australian defence and security thinking and an instrument of American policy in the Asia–Pacific. How is it that an alliance conceived as a bulwark against a resurgence of Japanese militarism and which cut its military and intelligence teeth in the Cold War is still relevant to today’s strategic concerns?...

Joko Widodo's Indonesia: Possible Future Paths, September 2014. This paper looks at the possible paths for policy and development in Indonesia under the leadership of the seventh president of Indonesia, Joko Widodo, who will take office in Jakarta on 20 October. The first part is a stocktake of the challenges that lie ahead. The stocktake assesses the state of play in five areas: the political system; economic challenges; government and administration; social issues; and foreign affairs...

The Submarine Choice: Perspectives on Australia's Most Complex Defence Project, September 2014. In April this year ASPI staged a conference called The Submarine Choice. In this book you’ll find a summary of each of the talks that were given at the conference, and they contain a range of perspectives. As well, we’ve included some analytic insights from ASPI. Mark Thomson and Andrew Davies write on the complex suite of industrial options...

A Versatile Force: The Future of Australia's Special Operations Capability, April 2014. Over the past decade, the demands of the ADF’s global and regional operations saw an unprecedented growth in Australia’s special operations capability. Indeed, Special Operations Forces became the ‘capability of choice’ for the Australian Government. However, as the ADF enters a period of transition from almost constant high-tempo operations to what might be a ‘soft power decade’, there’s a need to consider the future of the capability...

Moving beyond Ambitions? Indonesia's Military Modernisation, November 2013. Indonesia’s impressive political and economic development in recent years has fuelled expectations that Australia’s much larger neighbour could join the ranks of the world’s ten largest economies as early as 2030. While there are good reasons to caution against such long-term predictions, there’s a high likelihood that Indonesia will become stronger relative to Australia. Consequently, Prime Minister Tony Abbott has made the relationship with Indonesia a top foreign policy priority...

Agenda for Change: Strategic Choices for the Next Government, August 2013. The next government has a primary requirement to be well briefed on the challenges inherent in Australia’s strategic circumstances and the policy options available to it. ASPI is publishing this report to layout our strategic choices and to provide recommendations.

Terms of Engagement: Australia's Regional Defence Diplomacy, July 2013. This major study of Australian defence engagement is authored by Sam Bateman, Anthony Bergin and Hayley Channer. Australia is in the process of pivoting back to our own region and looking for new strategies for Defence re-engagement. But the Defence Cooperation Program hasn’t been scrutinised in any dep...

Facing the Dragon: China Policy in a New Era, May 2013. Recapping the dramatic Whitlam-Nixon openings to China of the 1970s—in which he participated—Ross Terrill’s new study finds fascinating themes for China policy today. Our Asia–Pacific region prospers, but the seas off China are not tranquil. American policies protect Australia, but they worry...

Planning the Unthinkable War: 'AirSea Battle' and its Implications for Australia, April 2013. The publication, written by ASPI’s senior analyst in defence strategy Benjamin Schreer, analyses the US military’s new ‘AirSea Battle’ concept. In the Asia-Pacific region, the concept is primarily designed to counter China’s growing military power. The paper says Australia does not have...

Strategic Contours: The Rise of Asia and Australian Strategic Policy, July 2012. This report, authored by Rod Lyon, is a new assessment of the rise of Asia and its impact on Australian strategic policy. It provides an in-depth strategic assessment of a region where the dominant strategic condition is neither cooperation nor competition, but a strange blend of both—‘coopetit...

Two Steps Forward, One Step Back: Indonesia's Arduous Path of Reform, January 2012. Australians have long worried about whether Indonesia is ‘special’ or ‘normal’. Instead, we need to deal with Indonesia as it really is—a country experiencing simultaneously the challenges of political reform, economic development and a shifting regional security environment. The countr...

Beyond bin Laden: Future Trends in Terrorism, December 2011. This Strategy report examines the shifting patterns of global terrorism. It is the first major ASPI report on terrorism since the death of Osama bin Laden in May 2011. The report provides a comprehensive assessment of the geographic, operational and ideological trends that are driving the current wave of ji...

Our Near Abroad: Australia and Pacific Islands Regionalism, November 2011. This report, authored by Richard Herr and Anthony Bergin, suggests that with rising Chinese influence in the region, the US appears to doubt that Australia can deliver on South Pacific issues. The Pacific Island members of the United Nations now meet under the rubric of the Pacific Small Islands Developing Sta...

Forks in the River: Australia's Strategic Options in a Transformational Asia, June 2011. This report, authored by Rod Lyon, argues that Australia will be drawn increasingly to grow its strategic engagement with Asian partners. An Asian engagement strategy should sit alongside our existing policies of alliance and self-reliance to provide a complementary set of approaches to enhancing Australian int...

Changing Pace: ASPI's Strategic Assessment 2011, February 2011. This report provides an in-depth strategic assessment of a world where the pace of change appears to be accelerating. The relative slippage in US power, and the broader decline of Western influence, portend an era of fraying global leadership. The assessment suggests Australia will have to worry about two strategi...

Regionalism and Community: Australia's Options in the Asia-Pacific, November 2010. This report, authored by Philomena Murray, explores the challenges of building a stronger ‘community’ in the Asia-Pacific. It does so by using a ‘comparative regionalism’ approach, drawing upon the lessons of region-building efforts elsewhere. Philomena argues in this paper...

Southeast Asia: Patterns of Security Cooperation, September 2010. Strategically, Southeast Asia sits at the intersection of the wider world and Australia’s local neighbourhood; what happens there matters to Australia. But the broader Asian security environment is in flux, and an era of strategic quiescence in Southeast Asia may be drawing to a close. Security trends there...

A Natural Power: Challenges for Australia's Resources Diplomacy in Asia, May 2010. This report, authored by Richard Leaver and Carl Ungerer argues that Australia’s role as a stable, low-cost supplier of key commodities to the emerging great powers of Asia, China and India, gives Canberra a greater diplomatic bargaining tool than previous governments have been willing to acknowledge...

Our Western Front: Australia and the Indian Ocean, March 2010. This Strategy report, authored by Sam Bateman and Anthony Bergin, argues that Australia should develop a comprehensive policy approach to our Indian Ocean neighbourhood. Australia is a three ocean country with the largest area of marine jurisdiction in the Indian Ocean, yet we have neglected the Indi...

A Delicate Issue: Asia's Nuclear Future, December 2009. The world stands on the cusp of a new era in nuclear relations—one in which Asia is likely to become the dominant influence on global nuclear arrangements. The old, bilateral nuclear symmetry of the Cold War is giving way to new multiplayer, asymmetric nuclear relationships. And it is doing so at a time when...

After the GFC: Australia and the Chimerica Challenge, September 2009. This Strategy report provides an indepth Australian perspective on the global financial crisis (GFC) and its consequences. How China and the US behave as they come out of the financial crisis will have global ramifications, but in few places are the stakes higher than in Australia...

The Human Tide: An Australian Perspective on Demographics and Security, June 2009. This report, authored by Mark Thomson, looks at demographics and security from an Australian perspective.The economic and demographic transition of countries from poverty to prosperity has been a driving force of history over the past two centuries, and is set to rem...

Sea Change: Advancing Australia's Ocean Interests, March 2009. Australia claims jurisdiction over more of the earth than any other country—around 27.2 million square kilometres or 5% of the planet, ahead of Russia and the US. Of this, our maritime domain is around 4% of the planet’s oceans. This Strategy, authored by Sam Bateman and Anthony Bergin,...

Global Jigsaw: ASPI's Strategic Assessment 2008, October 2008. Written by Rod Lyon and Christine Leah, the Assessment argues that Australia will increasingly have to find its security in a world of power shifts and greater interconnectedness. Despite its current financial difficulties, the US will remain the world’s strongest power. But we are witnessing a gradual ...

The Eagle in a Turbulent World: US and its Global Role, September 2008. Australia is one of the US’s closest allies, and its interest in America’s role in the world is both direct and immediate. Regardless of who wins the election,the US is not about to disengage from the world. Still, there are possibilities for important shifts in US strategic behaviour...

Tangled Webs: Security Architectures in Asia, July 2008. The report, authored by William Tow, presents a broad overview of regional security architectures and a guide for Australian policy makers o...

Neighbourhood Watch: The Evolving Terrorist Threat in Southeast Asia, June 2008. The regional terrorist threat remains high on the list of Australia's national security priorities. It is time to take stock of the regional security environment and to ask how the Southeast Asian terrorist threat might evolve in the future. This report, authored by Peter Chalk and Carl Ungerer, analyses the ...

Seeing Indonesia as a Normal Country: Implications for Australia, May 2008. Indonesia has changed markedly in the recent past and has become a more democratic and pluralist country. The report, authored by Professor Andrew MacIntyre and Dr Douglas E Ramage, urges Australia to understand the new stable landscape of Indonesia. It makes a number of specific policy recommendations includi...

Global Forces 2007: Proceedings of the ASPI Conference, December 2007. Some of the world's sharpest strategic thinkers debated the key issues shaping global and Asia-Pacific security at ASPI's Global Forces 2007 conference, 5-6 July 2007.

Power Plays: Energy and Australia's Security, October 2007. This report looks at the global demand for energy, its growth and the potential effects this has on Australia’s security. The report examines Australia’s need to factor energy security into its foreign and defence policies, and develop a greater awareness of its dependence on fossil fuels. It was a...
2008. Written by Rod

Widening Horizons: Australia's New Relationship with India, May 2007. The report, authored by Dr Sandy Gordon examines the effects this will have on the strategic architecture of Asia and the challenges facing Australia in developing the relationship between the two countries. Given India’s rise as a significant Indian Ocean and Asian power, Australia has pressing r...

Cutting their Cloth: New Zealand's Defence Strategy, April 2007. The Australian Strategic Policy Institute has today released a new Strategy publication, Cutting their cloth. New Zealand's defence strategy written by Jim Rolfe a senior fellow at the Centre for Strategic Studies in New Zealand. In this report Dr Jim Rolfe examines New Zealand's thoughts of it's defe... 2008. Written by Rod

Global Forces 2006: Proceedings of the ASPI Conference, December 2006. Some of the world's sharpest strategic thinkers debated the key issues shaping global and Asia-Pacific security at ASPI's Global Forces 2006 conference, September 2006.

Transforming the US Military: Implications for the Asia-Pacific, December 2006. Defence transformation has major implications for the future course of US military and security policy, particularly to the Asia-Pacific region. Australia should continue to monitor developments closely whilst reacting cautiously. This report was authored by Richard Bitzinger, an expert in defence transformation,...

Your Defence Dollar: The 2006-07 Defence Budget, August 2006. From a defence perspective, this year's federal Budget was the most important in half a decade. Your Defence Dollar, prepared by Mark Thomson, aims to inform discussion and scrutiny of the Defence budget and the policy choices it entails.

Global Forces 2005: Proceedings of the ASPI Conference, April 2006. Seventeen of the world's sharpest strategic thinkers debate the key issues shaping global and Asia-Pacific security at ASPI's inaugural conference held over 2 days in September 2005. This is a 2 volume set with Day 1 topics on Global Strategy and Day 2 on Strategic Change.

Riding the Wave: The Rise of China and Options for Australian Policy, March 2006. China's rapid economic growth rates are accompanied by military advances, a quest for markets, diplomatic assertiveness and increased national pride. Ross Terrill's paper urges clear thinking by Australians about the strength of the US, the place of deterrence, the ways Beijing's mercantilism differs from fr...

In the Balance: China's Unprecedented Growth and Implications for the Asia-Pacific, February 2006. Few issues are more important to Australia's long-term strategic position in the Asia-Pacific than the health of China's economy and the nature of Beijing's foreign and defence policies. In this report Chicago-based economist and prominent China watcher David Hale gives his assessment of China'...

Shared Interests: Australia-India Relations into the Twenty-first Century, December 2005. India matters to Australia, strategically, economically and diplomatically. At the fourth Australia-India Security Roundtable, held in Canberra in April 2005, fourteen strategic analysts from both countries met to discuss a range of important issues vital to each country's defence and security planning. This publica...

Plague Anatomy: Health Security from Pandemics to Bioterrorism, December 2005. This paper considers the spectrum of biological threats both naturaland deliberate. How well prepared is Australia to meet the twin challenges of infectious disease and bioterrorism? Plague Anatomy, prepared by Peter Curson and Brendan McRandle, explores these issues and offer...

Local Jihad: Radical Islam and terrorism in Indonesia, September 2005. Recent violent radicalism in Indonesia is seen by many as a relatively recent phenomenon, but a closer look at modern Indonesian history shows the inaccuracy of this view. Terrorism might be a global issue but for Australia the threat is inextricably tied up with the problems of the future stability of o...

Your Defence Dollar: The 2005-06 Defence Budget, August 2005. This year's federal budget was about laying the foundations for sustained prosperity in the Australia in the face of an ageing population. So, more than ever, its important that every defence dollar is spent to best effect. With this in mind, this report, prepared by Mark Thomson, aims to inform di...

Representative Views: Mass and Elite Opinion on Australian Security, June 2005. Authored by Professor Ian McAllister, of the Political Science Program at the Australian National University (ANU), the report gives Australians the opportunity to compare public and 'elite' opinion on a range of defence and security questions. It draws on Australia's most comprehensive and i...

Alliance Unleashed: Australia and the US in a New Strategic Age, June 2005. This report examines what the strategic future holds for Australia's relationship with the United States. Authored by Dr Rod Lyon the report concentrates on the reinvigorated Australia-US security partnership through the ANZUS alliance.

Living with Giants: Finding Australia's Place in a More Complex World, April 2005. The landscape of international politics in a few decades will be dominated by a company of giants: societies that will range demographically down from India and China at over a billion each, through those at four or five hundred millions, like the US and the EU, to those at the hundred million plus level. Of the nin...

Future Unknown: The Terrorist Threat to Australian Maritime Security, April 2005. The threat of maritime terrorism has led to fundamental changes in the international maritime security environment. This report, prepared by Anthony Bergin and Sam Bateman, identifies where gaps exist in current arrangements and includes recommendations to improve coordination between agencies and to develop...

War and Profit: Doing Business on the Battlefield, March 2005. The past fifteen years have seen a rapid growth in private sector firms supporting military operations. More recently, the ADF has employed the private sector to varying degrees in East Timor, Bougainville, Afghanistan and Iraq. The paper, prepared by Mark Thomson, puts forward four recommenda...

Strengthening Our Neighbour: Australia and the Future of Papua New Guinea, December 2004. Papua New Guinea is one of Australia's three top-priority foreign policy challenges. The deep nature of the problems in PNG makes it perhaps the most difficult we face. This paper, prepared by Elsina Wainwright and Hugh White, examines Australia's interests and the challenges facing PNG. It then sug...

Scoping Studies: New Thinking on Security, October 2004. Scoping Studies presents eleven views from a diverse selection of writers, each presenting their own list of the critical decisions the Government must make to keep Australia secure. ASPI intends that this publication should contribute to the defence and national security agenda for this new term of governmen...

Attitude Matters: Public Opinion in Australia Towards Defence and Security, August 2004. Public opinion has an important role to play influencing and shaping public policy. In Attitude Matters, prepared by Ian McAllister, it sets out some findings about how Australians have responded to questions about our security over more than a quarter of a century.

Your Defence Dollar: The 2004-05 Defence Budget, July 2004. This year's Defence budget is much like last year's. A lot more money has been provided to maintain today's ADF, while a significant chunk of planned investment in tomorrow's force has been deferred. Are we getting good value for money for our Defence dollar? It is worth knowing. This ...

Power Shift: Challenges for Australia in Northeast Asia, June 2004. The balance of power and influence in Northeast Asia is undergoing some fundamental shifts. As a region vital to Australia's interests, there are some opportunities as well as more than a few risks. This publication, prepared by Professor William Tow and Associate Professor Russell Trood, sets o...

Beyond Baghdad: ASPI's Strategic Assessment 2004, May 2004. Australia faces its most challenging and turbulent strategic outlook since the mid-1960s. In Beyond Baghdad, ASPI's 2004 Strategic Assessment prepared by Peter Jennings, we survey our troubled strategic horizon and recommend some new policy responses.

A Trillion Dollars and Counting: Paying for Defence to 2050, March 2004. Will we be able to afford our current range and scale of military forces through to 2050 as Australia's population ages and the cost of military capability mounts? And will there be enough young people to maintain the size of the force anyway? These critical questions are considered in this paper prepared ...

A Big Deal: Australia's Future Air Combat Capability, February 2004. This paper prepared by Aldo Borgu is a detailed assessment of the Australian Government's decision to effectively purchase the US F-35 Joint Strike Fighter to replace its existing fleets of F/A-18 and F-111 aircraft. It assesses whether the JSF might achieve the government's air combat requirements aga...

 

 

 

Source: The Australian Strategic Policy Institute